TU’s Community Science Program

Volunteers from across North Carolina have been putting boots on the ground to better trout streams and improve coldwater habitat. Over 50 people have come out to support TU Community Science projects in the Wilson Creek watershed and the Sky Island area (headwaters of the Davidson, Mills, Pigeon, and Tuckasegee Rivers).

Completed surveys from our AOP Barrier Survey crews in Wilson Creek and Sky Island Watersheds. Each colored dot represents one road-stream crossing structure that volunteers have measured. The colors indicate how difficult it would be for aquatic organisms to move through the structure.

Through their efforts, we are identifying road-stream crossing structures that are barriers to the movements of fish and other aquatic species in our local streams and sources of sedimentation that negatively impact our waterways. While our teams are doing great, the need is big, and we could use more volunteers to amp up the program.  We’re hosting another round of training sessions for these important programs.

Sedimentation Survey Program Training:

  • September 21 – Upper Pigeon Watershed
  • October 19 – Wilson Creek
  • November 16 – Upper Tuckasegee Watershed

Aquatic Organism Passage Barrier Survey Training:

  • September 20 through September 21 – Upper Tuckasegee Watershed
    (starts 7PM 09/20, 8AM 09/21)
Sign Up For Sedimentation / AOP Survey Training

Didymo

Scum. Rock snot. No matter what you call it, this slimy covering found on the stream bottom of some local waterways can quickly ruin a fishing day. Many an angler has found themselves with waders full of water after slipping on a patch of this strange aquatic species.

Mats of the single-celled algae don’t just pose a threat to your balance, they may be negatively impacting stream-dwelling species that need clean gravel and cobble to live.

Justin Murdoch of Tennessee Tech University is working with NC Wildlife Resources to launch a project to determine and understand the presence of didymo in western North Carolina and they’ve asked us to lend a hand.

With the cool temperatures of Fall on their way, many of us will be hitting our favorite local streams. The ask couldn’t be simpler: you collect water samples as you fish and send them in for testing. 

The kits are easy to use and come with detailed instructions. Those that sign up for collection will be mailed sampling materials and, after doing their collection, will mail them directly to Tennessee Tech. The kits are easy to use and come with detailed instructions. Those that sign up for collection will be mailed sampling materials and, after doing their collection, will mail them directly to Tennessee Tech.

Get Didymo Sampling Collection Kits

Sedimentation Survey Program Training

  • September 21 – Upper Pigeon Watershed
  • October 19 – Wilson Creek
  • November 16 – Upper Tuckasegee Watershed

AOP Barrier Survey Training:

  • September 20 through September 21